Part One: Discovering the high-performance athlete inside

Triathlon is a unique sport in that professionals and amateurs often compete on the same course and on the same day, if not side-by-side. For many of us, it’s a lifestyle sport. Unlike many other amateur sports, even the shortest sprint distance triathlon demands a significant outlay of time and effort, not to mention the hemorrhaging of cash credit card debt.  It’s very easy to let the sport take over your entire life. And really, what better obsession? When the sport does take over your entire life, you put up pictures of Paula Findlay or Crowie on your cubicle walls. You derive a sick pleasure in watching people cringe when you tell them you spent more than $500 $5000 on a bicycle, and that you have at least two or three of them.

You probably do this for a reason. If you didn’t at least enjoy it, there wouldn’t really be a point at all, no? This is what discovering your inner elite is all about. Whether you are racing competitively against others, or whether you are racing for your own heart.

I do it because it is a challenge, to see whether I am capable of finishing things that ordinary people would call extraordinary. But it’s really not about that. There’s nothing special about the things that we do, except for the fact that we choose to do them.

So if there’s nothing extraordinary about the things that we do, or for that matter, the things that the elite do, then shouldn’t it mean that there’s no difference between the elite, and you?  There is no difference between any of us.

Through racing a few years ago, I learned that I am good enough to justify the time and expense of the triathlon lifestyle. An injury set me back a bit, but 2014 affords a new opportunity to start again.

There is nothing more rewarding in my life when I finally see that spark in someone’s eyes, when they finally get it.

So, make it real. Here are some ideas:

  • Get a personalized license plate for your car. Something like “TRI4PR” or “CARBON”.
  • Create an “Athlete” page on Facebook, so that you can have actual fans!
  • Get someone to take pictures of you and your bike (like you might see in Triathlete magazine).

I think the first point of order here is to really begin to accept myself as a high-performance athlete. That’s not to say that I’m pro-level or elite, but as a high-performance athlete, there is a slightly different bar that applies to me, my workouts, my day job, and my personal life.  But being a high-performance athlete means eliminating all those excuses, and making it real.  Not because I have to, but because there’s no better feeling than doing something that everyone else thought was impossible.

All the best to you, in 2014,

Darryl

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